Excerpts from THE  WATER REPORT 

September 2021 issue 74

FULL STORIES AVAILABLE ONLY IN THE MAGAZINE IN PRINT AND PDF

CONTENTS full contents of the magazine  

FEATURE Storm overflows – time to separate.

 

REPORT The 2020 EPA.

 

REPORT Environment elevated in SPS.

 

REPORT WINEP reform consultation.

 

REPORT Can we join up strategic water planning?

 

REPORT IPCC report and net zero ambitions.

 

INDUSTRY COMMENT A better way for biosolids?

 

SPECIAL REPORT

Non household metering: where now, where next?

 

NEWS REVIEW Green light for the Green Recovery.

 

FEATURE South East Water pioneers demand management TUBs.

 

NEWS REVIEW Review finds PR14 was “transformative”.

 

INDUSTRY COMMENT Citizen empowerment through smart insights. 

 

INDUSTRY COMMENT Customer engagement: a core capability.

 

INDUSTRY COMMENT  A tough first year for AMP7. 

 

REPORT Macquarie returns with Southern purchase.

 

NEWS REVIEW Abstraction charge changes. 

 

NEWS REVIEW Taming the Beast from the East.

 

INDUSTRY COMMENT Landowners and net zero.

 

Dot-to-dot

continued

The Environment Agency’s (EA) Stuart Sampson, who specialises in water resources and drought, says that in parallel with the push on joining up strands of water planning, there is a move to consider future resilience much more prominently as well.

 

“This isn’t just about the here and now,” he points out. Sampson explains that traditionally, policy lags behind need; statutory water resources management plans (WRMPs) and drought plans were introduced in the 1990s, for instance, once it was clear they were necessary. 

High not dry

continued

The idea of using TUBs to manage these localised and unprecedented peaks in demand was initially the suggestion of the local authorities in South East Water’s area. Dance explains this is not something water companies usually do, with usage restrictions typically reserved for resource shortages.

 

However, preliminary conversations with Defra and the Environment Agency (EA) proved positive, and the company established there was nothing formal to prevent a company applying for a TUB to manage demand. 

 

Separate

continued

The campaigners have a simple and reasonable enough request: we, the British public, no longer find it acceptable for untreated sewage to bob along rivers we might want to swim in or enjoy the amenity of, and we’d rather our fish and other wildlife weren’t killed off or contaminated please.

 

The water companies ‘dumping’ raw sewage are the bad guys, aided and abetted by the Environment Agency who does little about it, and the Government which has slashed the Environment Agency’s budget. 

 

NEWS REVIEW Thames to compensate for bad data. 

 

REPORT Market Improvement Fund launch.

 

INTERVIEW Simon Bennett and Richard Stanbrook on the RWG governance review.

 

NEWS REVIEW Covid bad debt apportioned.

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Green

continued

Among Defra’s specific directions to Ofwat were:

• challenge companies to contribute to the relevant outcomes in the 25YEP and delivery of the relevant targets set under the Environment Bill;

• encourage companies, when supported by their customers, to deliver wider environmental benefits in the course of carrying out their functions;

• encourage companies to operate in partnerships across catchments and maximise co-funding and green finance opportunities, where appropriate, and  support an increase in the use of nature-based solutions where appropriate; and

• challenge companies to prioritise improvements to protected sites and recognise the importance of priority habitats such as chalk streams, including the need to address nutrient pollution. 

 

WINEP

continued

Among Defra’s specific directions to Ofwat were:

• challenge companies to contribute to the relevant outcomes in the 25YEP and delivery of the relevant targets set under the Environment Bill;

• encourage companies, when supported by their customers, to deliver wider environmental benefits in the course of carrying out their functions;

• encourage companies to operate in partnerships across catchments and maximise co-funding and green finance opportunities, where appropriate, and  support an increase in the use of nature-based solutions where appropriate; and

• challenge companies to prioritise improvements to protected sites and recognise the importance of priority habitats such as chalk streams, including the need to address nutrient pollution. 

 
 

Fund

continued

Form

continued

The launch was postponed after Covid hit and it became clear retailers were under exceptional cash pressure. Now, he says, the time is right to pick up where they left off and the plan has had “a really positive reception”.

Market performance charges raise around £4m a year, so the £1m pot is for starters. There could potentially be two rounds a year and with larger pots in future – MOSL has deliberately “kept it really flexible” Formoy explains and, via the Panel, will consider scaling up if there is a healthy appetite to bid. 

The RWG’s more recent high profile projects “stand on the shoulders” of the work completed on more tactical challenges like interruptions to supply and improving complaints handling, he says.

 

The RWG’s success has been such that alongside winning the respect and voluntary participation of trading parties, the group has worked increasingly closely with MOSL (including through its User Forum) and won explicit praise and backing from Ofwat in the regulator’s 2020 RISE report on wholesaler support for effective markets

 
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